Hot Issues
spacer
Accessing superannuation benefits.
spacer
Does your business have a company Power of Attorney?
spacer
Labor tweaks stage 3 tax cuts to make room for ‘middle Australia’
spacer
GrantConnect
spacer
2 in 3 SMEs benefit from instant asset write-off, survey reveals
spacer
Updated guidance on R&D claims
spacer
Do you know how to recover debts?
spacer
Wheat Production by Country
spacer
Types of small business benchmarks
spacer
What is a Commercial Lease?
spacer
ATO warns advisers against suspect R&D tax claims
spacer
The year of workplace law upheaval
spacer
How to Resolve Invoice Payment Disputes
spacer
Raft of revenue tweaks in MYEFO to raise millions
spacer
The Countries that Export the Most Wine in the World
spacer
Record low invoice values ‘reveal inflation sting’
spacer
A 2023 Advent Calendar for our clients
spacer
Average refund plummets by $580, total payout down $5.4bn
spacer
FBT – Christmas Parties and Taxi Fare/Rideshare
spacer
Annual wage growth surges to 14-year high of 4%
spacer
Is My Organisation Exempt From the Spam Act?
spacer
Employee Christmas Parties and Gifts – Any FBT?
spacer
Most Expensive Wars In History
spacer
Australian Taxation Office (ATO) motor vehicle data matching program extended
spacer
Directors on the hook for cyber security, ASIC warns
Article archive
spacer
Quarter 4 October - December 2023
spacer
Quarter 3 July - September 2023
spacer
Quarter 2 April - June 2023
spacer
Quarter 1 January - March 2023
spacer
Quarter 4 October - December 2022
spacer
Quarter 3 July - September 2022
spacer
Quarter 2 April - June 2022
spacer
Quarter 1 January - March 2022
spacer
Quarter 4 October - December 2021
spacer
Quarter 3 July - September 2021
spacer
Quarter 2 April - June 2021
spacer
Quarter 1 January - March 2021
spacer
Quarter 4 October - December 2020
spacer
Quarter 3 July - September 2020
spacer
Quarter 2 April - June 2020
spacer
Quarter 1 January - March 2020
spacer
Quarter 4 October - December 2019
spacer
Quarter 3 July - September 2019
spacer
Quarter 2 April - June 2019
spacer
Quarter 1 January - March 2019
spacer
Quarter 4 October - December 2018
spacer
Quarter 3 July - September 2018
spacer
Quarter 2 April - June 2018
spacer
Quarter 1 January - March 2018
spacer
Quarter 4 October - December 2017
spacer
Quarter 3 July - September 2017
spacer
Quarter 2 April - June 2017
spacer
Quarter 1 January - March 2017
spacer
Quarter 4 October - December 2016
spacer
Quarter 3 July - September 2016
spacer
Quarter 2 April - June 2016
spacer
Quarter 1 January - March 2016
spacer
Quarter 4 October - December 2015
spacer
Quarter 3 July - September 2015
spacer
Quarter 2 April - June 2015
spacer
Quarter 1 January - March 2015
spacer
Quarter 4 October - December 2014
Do you know how to recover debts?

Beginning the year with a clean financial slate can be pivotal to your business’ health.

.

Clearing debts early enhances creditworthiness, reduces stress, and fosters cash flow. It also facilitates strategic planning and growth, setting a solid foundation for a successful year ahead.

Here are five steps for recovering debt:

  1. Revisit your business terms and conditions: these should set out what steps the debtor must take to resolve payment-related disputes. Your lawyer can help review this for you.
  2. Follow up: remind the debtor via email or phone of the amount due.
  3. Send a letter of demand: request the debtor pay the outstanding balance.
  4. Negotiate with the debtor: before going to court, your lawyer will first try to resolve the dispute.
  5. Go to court: commence a legal claim against the debtor.

Some other actions:

Issue a Letter of Demand

The first stage in the debt collection process is usually to issue a letter of demand. This is a formal letter requesting payment of the debt. It sets out the specific amount owed and the period in which the debtor can make payment before you take further legal action.

Sometimes, issuing a letter of demand can result in the parties entering into negotiations concerning the debt payment. If parties reach an agreed payment plan, they can enter a binding settlement deed outlining the agreed proposal. This payment plan can be in full or instalments.

A formal letter can encourage a creditor to promptly take action. However, there is always some level of risk that a debtor may ignore the letter or raise a dispute concerning the debt.

Going to court

Going to court to recover a debt is intimidating, expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, you should think carefully before embarking on this final stage of the debt recovery process, especially if you have not exhausted your alternative options for getting paid. This article outlines what you should consider before filing your statement of claim.

  • Consider Whether Your Debtor Can Pay
    Even if you have a strong claim, if your debtor has no means to pay, you may get little from starting a lawsuit. Therefore, before commencing court proceedings, find out what you can about your debtor’s finances. For example, by checking their credit report and bankruptcy status.
     
  • Determine if You Can Prove Your Claim
    Every good lawyer will tell you that ‘litigation is never a sure thing’. The more evidence you have to support your claim, the stronger your position will be. While evidence in the form of written documents is always best, it is not essential. The court will determine a claim without written documentation on a ‘he said/she said’ basis.

 

 

 

Legal Vision

site By AcctWeb